/kind/ - kind

No bully! Be kind!

Max message length: 4096

Drag files to upload or
click here to select them

Maximum 3 files / Maximum size: 10.00 MB

More

(used to delete files and postings)


Open file (13.05 KB 138x135 1622106769680.jpg)
Friend 06/28/2021 (Mon) 16:35:06 No.899
I think it's interesting that there's people all over the world who have different kinds of families and speak different kind of language and have different customs and daily routines. It may sound obvious but I find it very interesting when I think about it. I don't know what the point of this thread is or if there is one. Post something interesting about your country or family. Here's a fun fact about finland, we have several different dialects in different parts of the country that change the word "you" and "I". The official words are "sinä" and "minä", but there's also "sä"/"sää"/"sie", and "mä"/"mää"/"mie". Here's another fun fact, "sää" also means "weather", and "mää" is the sound sheep make.
>>899 >Post something interesting about your country or family. We had an ancestor who was hailed as a minor Revolutionary War hero. My grandmother took the time to trace our lineage back to him.
>>899 How is life in Finland? Heard it is a nice country. Love how you guys play icehockey btw.
Open file (689.19 KB 2012x1220 water everywhere.png)
>>903 >How is life in Finland? Heard it is a nice country. I don't interact with people outside of my family much nor live in a bigger city so I can't give a very meaningful assessment, but from what I know it's nice. People tend to mind their own business and let you mind yours, but they're chill if you talk to them. People seem to like tinkering with motorbikes and cars a lot, when I was in school it was customary for almost everyone to get a motorbike when they turned 16, I had one too but never got into that stuff much. The town I live in feels very natural, there's lots of maintained grass and trees and bushes everywhere, most of the place feels a bit like a park so it's nice to take walks. One thing I hate is that Finland is very, very flat, if you want to live in a place with some kind of mountains or hilly terrain then you better go to another country unless you want to live up north somewhere 100 miles away from the nearest store. I guess the abundance of lakes kind of make up for it. Many people own boats and drive around places with them, pic related is what a lot of the country looks like. If you want a house with it's own slice of a shore it's not very hard to find one. From what I've heard the politics here are about as clown worldy as anywhere else (some weird nepotistic girls club over there), but I don't pay attention to it. Our capital is a joke and everyone outside of it seems to agree, but from what I can tell most of the country is unaffected. Here's another fun fact, the west edge of the country is very Swedish, if you look for houses there it's all in Swedish. I'm not even sure if they speak Finnish in there.
>>901 I would feel mildly proud to be part of that family.
>family >Finland I don't have a fun fact but I have a /kind/ image to contribute.
>>899 >different dialects in different parts of the country that change the word "you" and "I" >Here's another fun fact, "sää" also means "weather", and "mää" is the sound sheep make. Interesting. Reading that, I wonder if there are any jokes based on this?
Open file (411.05 KB 650x985 doc300.jpg)
>>899 >Post something interesting about your country or family. Something interesting about the U.S. that ties into Finland is that Sweden has a colony along the Delaware River for less than 20 years, after which it was taken by the over by the Dutch. There were a substantial minority of settlers who were actually Finns, and they rose to around half the population after the Dutch conquest. As far as family goes, I apparently have at least one ancestor who was on the Mayflower if the sources are correct. Most of my recent ancestors were Catholics who only showed up in the U.S. in the 19th century (some even after the Civil War), so that fact helps me feel less insecure about my identifying more culturally with the Old Stock settlers more than the later waves. >>905 >One thing I hate is that Finland is very, very flat, if you want to live in a place with some kind of mountains or hilly terrain then you better go to another country unless you want to live up north somewhere 100 miles away from the nearest store. I guess the abundance of lakes kind of make up for it. Many people own boats and drive around places with them, pic related is what a lot of the country looks like. If you want a house with it's own slice of a shore it's not very hard to find one. My area's really similar. A lot of people find it beautiful, but I would like to move somewhere different eventually. >>901 Nice. Genealogy's really an interesting topic if you're able to find enough documentation on your family. I'm descended from a guy who was apparently the oldest man to fight in the Revolutionary War. I'm not sure how much I believe his story (extreme longevity claims interest me, and living as long as he's said to have lived is pretty doubtful given that the oldest verified person only lived to 122), but he's an interesting figure. Pic related. Apparently he has a ton of descendants due to allegedly having so many kids. I've also found around three people in my family tree who fought at Lexington. The nice thing about learning this stuff is that it can help you feel a stronger connection with the past. It's actually got me into reading more about the history of colonial America to understand my ancestors better. The funny thing is that we're so different culturally nowadays from even recent ancestors that I'd feel really uncomfortable meeting and talking to them if such a thing were possible, even if I'd be interested in what they had to say.
>>905 Sounds great, like a quiet and small place with a lot of nature. Why is Helsinki considered a joke though? I have heard that Swedish is the second most spoken language in Finland, I assume it is because Finland was once a part of Sweden in the past? Would be kinda strange if a part of a country doesn't even speak it's language. The language is very hard to learn anyway, isn^t it?
Another family+Finland+/kind/ image.
Open file (141.59 KB 800x3400 1438258.png)
>>921 I once read that there is/was a place somewhere in the northern US that has a majority Finnish ancestry. Pretty surprising considering how small Finland is. >>941 >Why is Helsinki considered a joke Mostly because people there are the very dumb kind of college liberals who have lost grips with reality, and it has a lot of the same problems as other European capitals. We have a very low amount of issues with the police or "racism" and there isn't a meaningful amount of black people to begin with, but Helsinki was one of the places that had a black lives matter protests. >The language is very hard to learn anyway, isn^t it? I think it's difficult primarily because instead of using more words to convey different meanings, Finnish has certain rules for modifying words in order to change their meanings. For example: Veli = brother Veljesi = your brother Veljelläsi = your brother (has) It also changes depending on the word so the rules aren't completely straightforward, for example: Kissa = cat Kissasi = your cat Kissallasi = your cat (has) For the second one you only add "si" at the end, but for 'brother' you inject "jes" before the last 'i'. And for the (has) version you use 'a' instead of 'ä'. I'm sure there's some logic behind it but I've completely forgotten what it is, I just intuitively understand it. But that's not all, you wouldn't normally say "kissasi", instead you'd just use the word "your" the same way as in English and say "sinun kissa". I don't exactly know which one is more correct or it both of them are equally valid, but I think very few people would ever use the word "kissasi". It gets even worse if you take into account the different dialects, for example instead of saying "veljelläsikään" (your brother also doesn't [have]), you'd remove the 'i' and 'n' and say "veljelläskää". I think everyone would speak it that way though, so maybe it's more like common slang than a dialect.
>>994 >I once read that there is/was a place somewhere in the northern US that has a majority Finnish ancestry. Pretty surprising considering how small Finland is. That must be the Upper Peninsula of Michigan you're thinking of: https://www.thoughtco.com/finnish-culture-of-michigans-upper-peninsula-1434523 In the western counties, they're the biggest ancestral group. >Mostly because people there are the very dumb kind of college liberals who have lost grips with reality, and it has a lot of the same problems as other European capitals. We have a very low amount of issues with the police or "racism" and there isn't a meaningful amount of black people to begin with, but Helsinki was one of the places that had a black lives matter protests. It seems like cities with universities always attract that kind of insanity, even the smaller ones to a degree.
Open file (3.66 MB 300x154 ajja.gif)
>this turned into a Finland Appreciation thread Neat. Not Finnish but I suppose something interesting is I can trace my family to a VERY small town in another country, and then after that, there's nothing. Records and such were lost following an earthquake many, many, years ago. They can't get enough money to dig stuff up, and no one else really cares because the place is so small. It's not so much fun as it is sorta interesting, but yeah.
>>1296 >I can trace my family to a VERY small town in another country, and then after that, there's nothing. Records and such were lost following an earthquake many, many, years ago. They can't get enough money to dig stuff up, and no one else really cares because the place is so small. It's not so much fun as it is sorta interesting, but yeah. Yeah, that really sucks. In the case of the last ancestors I have to come to America, I don't even know the town they were from. In my experience, Great Britain seems to have traditionally had the best documentation for this sort of thing.
>>1304 >I don't even know the town they were from That sucks to not have had the history at least passed down by word of mouth. We might not have anyone left in that part of the world, but if we want to visit it, we do know where it is.
>>1329 I think I've pinpointed the general region within the country they came from, but all I can really do is make an educated guess based on surnames and immigration patterns. I'm not even 100% sure what their first names were, since I think they might've been anglicized. That makes finding records harder than it would normally be.
Open file (81.13 KB 512x323 unnamed.jpg)
I have a bad relationship with my family so instead I will say a few things about my country. >Poland >We have been an oligarchic democracy with all nobles having the right to vote when most other countries in the world were monarchies. We merely elected our king as a president. Read up on Golden Liberty. >We had an idea of a nation and nationalism far earlier than other countries. Our nobility and culture went crazy on oriental aesthetics and believed themselves to be commonly descendant from Sarmatians. Look up sarmatism for more info on that. >Because of that, the nobility had an idea of equality before the law, and although classicist in nature, Poland had something that you could liken to civil liberties or civil rights for the nobility, including the right to vote no matter your wealth. >Poland was also EXTREMELY tolerant as a society, we were the only country which actually allowed Jews in, giving them civil liberties to do whatever they want and even saying that they can come here if they don't have anywhere else to go. We had a minority of islamists which exist to this day and were accepting of basically all types of Christianity with all manner of people coming to our country. We were basically a multi-cultural society in the middle of Europe. >That being said, we were also gigantic at the time, and at a certain time, we almost owned Russia, having actually occupied it temporarily during time of troubles. We geniuently captured Moscow.
>>1337 It's interesting that you mention the all this considering that I just read about the Sarmatianist nobility the other day.

Report/Delete/Moderation Forms
Delete
Report

Captcha (required for reports)

no cookies?