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The internet is probably bad for my health Friend 07/12/2021 (Mon) 11:22:48 No.1318
Do you think imageboard/online-anonymity in general worsens or improves your psyche? At first I was leaning towards the anonymity that comes with them, it's great to be able to discuss without prejudices, but obviously there is the other side of the coin, whenever an interesting/respectful conversation is happening there are always bad apples inbetween who shitpost, troll, offend etc. to get reactions out of others I guess. In my opinion bad experiences stick longer than good ones, and I think of myself as too sensitive, so insults (not even those directed at me, as I hardly post anything) can literally destroy me, I stopped going to larger imageboards that seem to attract those kind of people, I also stopped playing online-games almost completely or at least mute others, or force myself to stop reading comments on sites like Youtube. Nevertheless I still come back to some of the smaller boards, as seeing other viewpoints can put things in perspective and in relation to my thoughts, and sometimes I find nice boards like this one. I am already in my late 20s, and it was only in the last years that I started visiting boards frequently, I can't imagine how much the negativity would have affected me in my youth. Maybe this bothers me so much because in my opinion the internet is a raw reflection of ourselves, where if you peel off societal norms you don't have to worry too much about repercussions, and it just very often tends to be an ugly reflection, which makes me lose faith in others more and more even outside the internet. So I am interested in knowing what you think, why have boards influenced you positively/negatively? Has the negativity made you tougher over time, in what way, or are you able to brush it off completely in the first place?
Almost asked if there wasn't a whole 200 post thread about this already, but it looks like every post here got wiped. I don't think using anonymous forums worsened/worsens my psyche. I was always going to turn out the way I did. For the same reason it didn't improve it either.
It "got to me" before I got meds for OCD. If incel lookism bullshit and similar things sound convincing to you, consider therapy and meds.
>>1318 It gets to me too. I just try to stick to enjoying entertainment media and not really reading comments anywhere. I have a few friends I message from time to time. It's not really enough for me, but desiring too much socialization usually ends up with having to wade through negativity all day long and slowly becoming more negative myself. >>1321 I am utterly convinced that the world is out to get me and others like me by pretending it's not as bad as it is. No, not really, but that is the kind of mindset I slowly slip into when I spend too much time in imageboards. Paranoid, and pessimistic. Therapy soon, medications never (they all make me worse unfortunately, but I'm sure it helps for some people).
Imageboards and Internet in general ruined my life. I’ve been cyber self-harming myself since my teens (im 30 now). Back in the day I considered parental control puritan and hanged out on boards and porn/gore sites. Now I understand why it exists. Its not that seeing someones face being flayed by mexican drug cartels ,or exposed to the constant negativity of regular imageboards, will traumatize you. It’s that it is gonna make you only see the worst in society and is going to make you an asshole yourself. It’s slow erosion, not trauma. Also nowadays I can’t open a newspaper without reading some misandrist stuff on how as a male I’m super privileged and shit despite being a lonely virgin. Had to completely shelter myself from news and non-vidya entertainment because of that
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Imageboards were always just entertainment to me. I can't think of any good or bad effect beyond what any fun hobby might provide.
>>1321 The blackpill is valid.
A bit of both. The general negativity can slowly build up and reflect in your own thoughts and behaviour, but the golden nuggets some anons share can help develop yourself.
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>>1318 >Maybe this bothers me so much because in my opinion the internet is a raw reflection of ourselves, where if you peel off societal norms you don't have to worry too much about repercussions, and it just very often tends to be an ugly reflection, which makes me lose faith in others more and more even outside the internet. I agree with this but this is exactly why I believe that interent is mainly a good thing. Because it forces people to stop pretending to be wholly good. The internet is by nature against the sanitised ideas of the world. It holds in it the collective shadow of humanity, and as we see our society banishing the shadow often, it can only leak out in other forms. You can't wish the shadow away, it exists in all of us, and if we aren't aware of it, it destroys us or makes us destroy others. Repressing our shadows and the narcissistic ideas we replaced it with has led to the most horrible crimes in human history. This is why we cannot. We have to face it, look it in the eyes and accept it. We have to embrace it. Embrace all of our more violent desires, things that we would consider "weak" about ourselves, "evil". We need to integrate it into ourselves and stop fearing it. If we truly want not to hurt others, to become kinder people... we need to understand the capabilities of the dark and repressed inside of us. Our flaws, primal instincts and all of the terrible and terrifying strength that comes with us. We must face our demons, and make peace with them.
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>>1321 OCD really sounds like something that could apply to me, but I think for me it's more of a general feeling of dread about different topics, even relatively small and dumb things like for example reading about a comment in a Touhou-love-thread about how Touhou sucks, or a thread about the mangaka Kentarou Miura who passed away recently, which derailed into mocking the quality of his work, calling him lazy and he deserved death and so on. Of course those are mostly shit-posts, and maybe a "normal" person can just ignore those and move on, but like I mentioned that stuff really gets me more than it should, same with online-games like Overwatch or even MMOs, getting insulted for being a bad player for example follows me for a long time. I think there is also a competetive "I am right and you are wrong"-mentality on imageboards, where it mostly seems to be about who can insult each other in the most creative ways possible. >>1323 >stick to enjoying entertainment media and not really reading comments That's what I will be doing too even more from now on, I finally continued the Spice and Wolf-novels and they calm me down, in the end I think that I just really like to read and small portions like userposts are quicker to skim through than taking the time to read through a book usually, but it's getting clearer to me that I need to have a healthier more confident mind before sinking deeper into other opinions that shouldn't even bother me. maybe the less offline relationships one has the more dangerous online posts can be that put them into perspective. >>1332 I also came across some of those gore-sites early, only the internet was not as easy accessible to me in my youth that I forgot about them again, later I stumbled upon imageboards because a colleague talked about them a few times and meant that they also influenced him quite a bit, and my first thoughts where "Well the people are really mean on there" to which he just laughed. That's honestly one of my main concerns, to become too much of an asshole myself. >>1336 Definitely, the question for me is if the nuggets are worth the filth I have to brush off them. >>1338 Those are thoughtful points, so you are saying that people can use the internet as an outlet for their worst parts, so ultimately we become better people in the real world, only isn't the internet becoming more and more blurred with real life considering the easy access via social media and younger people growing up with it nowadays? I mean on social media you have already political bubbles and whatnot, where people start fighting each other with more or less their real names already. I can believe that we all have those shadows, only in different sizes, so in the imageboard-case while it makes sense for someone with a large shadow to embrace theirs, in my opinion the problem is that the smaller ones then have to put up with the larger ones, which shouldn't be theirs to deal with if that makes sense? On the other hand though, if you know where those shadows lurk then it's again your own responsibilty to decide if you are able to face them.
>>1340 >so you are saying that people can use the internet as an outlet for their worst parts, so ultimately we become better people in the real world It used to be this way, but now the internet is more connected with reality than it was before... this isn't necessarily a bad thing because it means that people are unable to pretend even more and are forced to show their true colors to everyone. By seeing the darkness of others, maybe some will also be pushed into looking at their own darkness. I would say that the reason why the internet is becoming more censored to begin with is exactly because people are trying to pretend they are perfect and without flaws. They are running from themselves and begging corporations and governments to protect them from themselves. Generally, that seems to be the start of any authoritarian hellhole in the end. >I can believe that we all have those shadows, only in different sizes Kind of, one's shadow is generally the same as other people, it's just that different parts are pronounced. By this I mean: Everyone enjoys hurting others to some extent, there is obviously a sadistic pleasure about hurting others... that does not mean that evetyone likes hurting others to the same extent. Everyone has a narcissistic streak, but not everyone has it to the same extent. And so on and so forth.
>>1338 >I agree with this but this is exactly why I believe that interent is mainly a good thing. Because it forces people to stop pretending to be wholly good. The problem is when people see those things and instead of being disgusted by them, start being proud of them or seeing them as acceptable. How many people are mature enough to look at flaws in others >shit, I am just like them, I need to fix that instead of coping, projecting and bargaining like >those who disagree with me have those flaws, not me >and those aren't even flaws, they're based >I hate those who are unlike me, because they have those flaws I believed some really dumb shit because of the internet. If not for my contrarian and inquisitive personality, I might still believe it now. I see many people who believe the same dumb shit I believed, but they don't question it. How are people who see themselves as wrongly persecuted warriors of all goodness supposed to learn anything good from seeing evil in others?
>>1413 At the end of the day accepting your own shadow or not is a choice. It's something that an individual needs to do by themselves. Maybe force was a bad word, you cannot really force anyone to become self-aware, it's impossible. But you can show them things, question them and try to make them think hoping they will figure things out on their own.
>>1413 >If not for my contrarian and inquisitive personality, I might still believe it now. I see many people who believe the same dumb shit I believed, but they don't question it. I know what you mean, no matter where you go, be it imageboards or twitter, it seems that there are always some stupid sacred cows that everyone is trying to protect.
It depends on the person and the community. I for example am fine with the bullying as I do not care but it is just how I am and it is ok that you are more sensitive <3 I think IB's can be bad for dummy heads who cannot think for themselves because they just pick up the group think and that can be defeatist attitudes etc. You sort of need to be able to stand on your two feet and personally interacting on reddit or something is far worse for me than on IB's. If you are new to IB as you say then you only know the tail end of them where the anonymity is nearly always purely used for bully and shitposting. I don't use big chan for this reason and know many don't as it is just sifting through garbage.
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>>1318 I think the issue for a lot of boards or places is that they end up reinforcing negative opinions, thoughts or attitudes that can definitely make someone, if not miserable at least worse for wear. Despite anonymity, there is often a deep pressure to at least conform to a certain way of doing things. >the internet is a raw reflection of ourselves, where if you peel off societal norms you don't have to worry too much about repercussions, and it just very often tends to be an ugly reflection, which makes me lose faith in others more and more even outside the internet. I'm not sure if I would be THAT pessimistic about humanity. I think people may tend to act more sociopathic towards others online not because humans are generally like that but because there is few means to feel empathy. If you're face to face, you can generally understand people's emotions a lot more through all sorts of social cues. Online, however, a lot of the time you're just communicating with a wall of text that you know nothing about. That's not something we are wired to empathise with. I will not deny that there are people who use their anonymity to be an asshole broadly, even when the relationship stops being anonymous e.g. through doxxed information. But I think one should keep in mind that such behaviour represents only a minority of people out there. Most people generally do not act that way on the internet, talking to a typical 'normie' makes that pretty clear imo. >So I am interested in knowing what you think, why have boards influenced you positively/negatively? I would say some places added to my misery because of the overall negative attitudes espoused tends to create a generally unhappy place to be so I would say they would've affected me to an extent. Leaving such places generally makes me happier in the long run. >Has the negativity made you tougher over time, in what way, or are you able to brush it off completely in the first place? I think I was generally able to brush insults directed towards me off mostly because for myself it just isn't real life. IRL I think I would be much more affected, so I wouldn't say it has made me tougher over time. Generally I'd say that if you identify a place as causing negativity in your life it is best to leave it or at least take a short break.
>>1459 Not OP but: What you said about people being mean online I think it is worth saying that it depends on how you view it. On chans, people may say "KYS fgt lmao" and it does not literally mean this at all and even if it does you can just not care. If I was to write a heartfelt rant on a normie place it would be nothing but positive messages but on a chan all those negative opinions make the one positive one have worth. People are much more fake IRL because of social norms also in my view. normies gonna normie.
i was worst before anon board so generally i cant get worse. but you may have differing opinions.
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>Do you think imageboard/online-anonymity in general worsens or improves your psyche? You need a balance. It's nice to put forward an ego and have an identity on the internet, and to slink into anonymity with no prejuidice on what was said on an account history meaning you can fuck up over and over without essentially being forced to leave. Being harsh and getting into arguments for the sake of it since "that's how imageboards are supposed to work" has worn me down too and I just want all the needless bile to stop after years of it and people to be nice to me, constant badgering and arguments will only wear you down to the heart and drive you crazy. >I can't imagine how much the negativity would have affected me in my youth I started using imageboards before I was even 16 and it actually improved my well-being overall. What it did ruin was my ability to have a normal conversation without coming off as argumentative and talking to normalneighbours like I did before though. >>1338 >Repressing our shadows and the narcissistic ideas we replaced it with has led to the most horrible crimes in human history. Not doing this has given me a switch to turn on when to be aggressive or not and expanded my consciousness and allowed me more "movement" as a person; I don't know how you guys could become fixed assholes but would you mind telling me?
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>>1318 you need to get into the fucking robot, no way around it. If you don't risk getting upset, how can you gain anything worthwhile? Understand, THE COFFEE AND THE CHERRY PIE. HOw can you appreciate the good without the bad? The White Picket Fence era could not have been without ww2. My heart worms up everytime i go on a board with a general hostile sentiment and i have nice discussion because it is genuine and not to be taken for granted. However, i think people people "forcing" themselves irl to be nice is still genuine and healthy, as opposed to rddit "be nice to get upvoted" mentality. That being said the internet is probably ultimately bad for anybodys mental health, generally speaking.
>>1606 >Being harsh and getting into arguments for the sake of it since "that's how imageboards are supposed to work" has worn me down too and I just want all the needless bile to stop after years of it and people to be nice to me, constant badgering and arguments will only wear you down to the heart and drive you crazy. That hit the nail on the head for me.
>>1606 >Not doing this has given me a switch to turn on when to be aggressive or not and expanded my consciousness and allowed me more "movement" as a person; I don't know how you guys could become fixed assholes but would you mind telling me? You meant not repressing your shadow?
>>1827 That works, but you need to remember to not drink only coffee. Places as /kind/ are nice. >However, i think people people "forcing" themselves irl to be nice is still genuine and healthy, as opposed to rddit "be nice to get upvoted" mentality. To be honest, from what I've seen some subreddits by now are more open to actual discussion and less circlejerky than imageboards. The problem really is that the internet got pretty fucked after 2016.
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>>1827 >If you don't risk getting upset, how can you gain anything worthwhile? I had that opinion for a while too, my problem is I get too upset over trivial things. It's also context, when my grumpy Karate-Sensei is beating me with a stick then there is probably a lesson to be learned, if I get punched by strangers again and again then I don't see how that experience is worth a simple nice conversation. For example I saw once a poster in a vent-thread who was obviously desperate and wrote about how much his life sucked basically, and attached an anime picture to it. The only response he got at first was by someone who told him only how much he hated his picture and therefore won't engage with him, then again saying that he doesn't respect him because the poster didn't get into an argument with him over that. In my opinion the online-dicks the only ones "gaining" anything, they can go around punching each others faces in, only in that example it was clear that the dick wanted someone to pick on who obviously didn't have the energy to engage in that behaviour. Speaking up against something like that is cool, but often the negativity is normalized and sooner or later the dicks will come back or simply post somewhere else, while I don't believe that many who got insulted will be back and if they won't come back to places like that, then the dicks will only become more. Especially on imageboards the balance between risking and gaining anything is way too off for me, reading the wrong posts for only a few minutes on there can be enough to depress me for the rest of the day, so I guess I'll do without a cake. Though I wonder why it only started bothering me that much recently, it's probably more of a personal problem, in my childhood maybe I had to drink too much coffee and basically looked forward to cake the whole time. So after I finally got to enjoy it, I go online and see people throwing hot coffee in each others face.
>>1827 >HOw can you appreciate the good without the bad? You absolutely can. You can get bored with "good", but adding "bad" doesn't change it, except by replacing some of the "good". It's possible to have informative discussions without posters defaulting to calling each other tards for disagreeing. The only good parts of bad discussions that can't be replicated in better ones are: >when someone hates you, he'll call you a retard and not do the disgusting backhanded compliment or insinuation thing that young female social circles are infamous for >you get used to bad treatment and learn to ignore it Though the first one is more of a "shitty people doing shitty things" than a problem of niceness in itself. Earlier in history of imageboards, you also wouldn't get banned for words, so you could say anything you want. Nowadays you get banned if you try to "exercise your freedom of speech", so you can't safely go full schizo.
>>1318 The internet itself isn't bad, but the content on it varies a lot. Following links from some of the imageboards I've been able to find a lot of good reading material, I've also made good friends from certain boards, which the internet helps me keep in touch with If you look for the good you may find it
>>1878 Weren't the 4chan mods even in the early days prone to banning people on a whim? Regardless, it was obviously nowhere near as heavy handed then as it is now.
>>1885 It was million years ago. There was a long time when mods weren't banning much and anyone could just let the memes flow. Nowadays the rules are enforced randomly, with biggest offenses slipping by and minor ones getting bans, just because the minor ones happened when mod was around or got reported more times. Random bans mean that there is no sense of justice or consistency and that the ban evasion is selected for in the poster population.
>>1854 Don't think i don't get "too upset over trivial things" too, because i also do, very much so. I think we agree that there are many times where pushing through discomfort is worth it. It makes sense to not let yourself get unnecessarily upset over things that don't matter by disengaging with them. Really i think its necessary. It is easy however to go a step too far, and end up weaker and unhappier as a result. Since we are on kind, i was thinking that you might already have removed yourself from things that are "bad", and are trying to remove yourself from anything that makes you uncomfortable (which would be bad no doubt). If your not living in /kind/ conditions, it might make sense to not upset yourself too much when on the computer. i think it's worth asking yourself why you are on the internet or certain sites to begin with, and what you are trying to get out of it. When you want good human interaction the internet is a bad place to begin with, and it sure is getting worse at that.
>>1318 Image boards are a lot better, IMO, for one's mental health than named sites.
>>2072 Depends If you end up in a /pol/ and/or incel zone, you'll be fed the exact kind of shit that you find in a spree killer manifesto.
>>2072 It depends. Sometimes people on boards hold grudges against anons and they harass them for months. >Are you the x anon? >Because if so, Kiss yourself It's very uncomfy even if it's not a regular occurence, just knowing that there is someone willing to hate so intensely for so long for tiny things that don't even matter.
>>2077 You are right, but normie zoomers get fed insanity on a similar level on twitter or discord. I have the feeling that a lot of people who are into politics particularly are just degrees off of shooting people if would they be convinced that it furthers their agenda, and everybody is into politics.
I really don't know how to feel about the Net. I discovered it very early but for a long time I only used it to look up things for video games. With 15 I stumpled upon imageboards though and this fucked me up. Unfortunately I was never confronted with things like that and soaked all of that stuff up like a sponge. It truly poisoned my mind and turned my life into a hellscape. It took years for me to quit and afterwards I didn't touch imageboards for years. Those years where valuable to get better but a lot of damage was not revertable and I still do have issues to this day. In the end I returned to imageboards, not the big, fast, loud, edgy and rude ones though but the small, comfy, friendly, helpful and slow ones. I don't have any friends and very few interests. In order to read about things I like and have an exchange about them I use imageboards. They honestly prevent me from feeling lonely, they are the only place I can relate to people and even like them. IRL I am just so detached that I can't relate to people and most of the things just don't interest me. I am an introvert anyway and need a lot of time for myself anyway. At the end I have to say that the Internet did have a huge impact on me and brought a lot of harm to me. Nowadays it is still important but I have learned how to use it and not let it control me.
>>2304 >Nowadays it is still important but I have learned how to use it and not let it control me. I really dislike how long it took me to learn this. I got into imageboards at a young age, let it torment me and change me for the worse, got help and got away from imageboards, spend nearly a decade away from imageboards, revisit imageboards and immediately get sucked into the same black hole of anger, despair and anxieties. Took me a few years to get out of it the second time as well, but instead of quitting entirely I've rather just gotten better at disengaging from 99% of threads and limiting its use. I prefer going to slower imageboards now. I don't post a lot, I don't get hung up on dumb things, and I see more quality posts from people who visit every few days or weeks at most. Unfortunately social media as a whole is quite damaging to the psyche, at least for those susceptible to it — which is pretty much everyone to various degrees.
>>1318 Imageboards have improved my life a lot. They've gotten me into exercising more, reading more, and many interesting games/anime. I'm honestly quite surprised by the amount of friends here that believe it to have made their lives worse. While some negative outcomes have happened like how people started finding me unbearable to talk to as I would correct them on mistakes and not just agreeing with them all the time. I even had someone ask me why I corrected them so much once to which I made a heartfelt explanation of the importance of accuracy when speaking only to have them call my explanation bullshit. That's when I realized that most people don't care about being accurate when speaking because they tend to not say much of value. However it was an easy fix leaving no permanent problems. Even things like gore I see as a positive to experience as if I ever end up in a situation where there's gore I won't panic. Maybe this thought process is from the detachment I feel from almost everything That I've had since I could remember.
>>2304 >>2317 Your stories are similar to mine. I was already a messed up 14-year-old whose passions were beaten out of him both at home and at school, finding imageboards only made that worse. Sure, it was appealing initially: >dude i can say whatever i want on here! >whoaaaa these girls look my age! fapfapfapfapfapfap >yeah let's raid this random forum so i can feel power over someone for once for epic lulz!!1 But then the overall negativity brought out my latent self-hatred. They hated everything, so to fit in I had to hate everything too... including myself. I had a creative streak and liked to make all kinds of stuff: music, art, code, whatever. Once the poison seeped into my brain, though, I couldn't make anything without the thought of "it's garbage, nobody's going to like it, I should just quit". Yet at the same time I had a weird superiority complex and thought I was above the other nerds at school, even though they had friends and were passionate about their interests. All in all, it made my already-unhealthy teenage years even more so. It took me until the early 10s, when I had just reached adulthood, to realize how much imageboards were damaging me (probably because in my senior year, I finally had friends for a short while). So I started seeking out small forums relevant to my interests. Only problem was that by that time, the internet was undergoing a lot of changes. People were ditching forums for social media and Reddit, everything was turning political, witchhunts were becoming more and more commonplace. So I had no choice but to return to imageboards. At least small ones like this aren't nearly as bad. >Unfortunately social media as a whole is quite damaging to the psyche, at least for those susceptible to it — which is pretty much everyone to various degrees. You know, every now and then I dream of a scenario where everyone returns to pre-social-media services like forums and IRC, but I know that's never going to happen. Even when people know that social media is harming them, there's still the network effect preventing them from going anywhere else. The only way I can see anything changing is for influential-enough people to advertise some messageboards that people can go to and hang out at. But I doubt these influential people would want to return to smaller services, Twitter makes them feel like celebrities with how many followers they have.
>>2622 This. It might have added to the sense of distance between me and other people, but they introduced me to a lot of music, movies, games, and ideas that I wouldn't have necessarily found on my own. I initially came to imageboards for the humor but found so much more. Discovering imageboards was a definite tradeoff, but it's one I've found to be worth the cost. >>2625 >You know, every now and then I dream of a scenario where everyone returns to pre-social-media services like forums and IRC, but I know that's never going to happen. Even when people know that social media is harming them, there's still the network effect preventing them from going anywhere else. The only way I can see anything changing is for influential-enough people to advertise some messageboards that people can go to and hang out at. But I doubt these influential people would want to return to smaller services, Twitter makes them feel like celebrities with how many followers they have. I'm waiting to see if Urbit will get off the ground and start attracting enough interesting people to make it viable. The normalfriends I don't really care about, since they don't really have much to contribute. It would be like a return to the smaller scale of the old Internet.
>>1332 >it is gonna make you only see the worst in society and is going to make you an asshole yourself very much this, i experienced it myself. im now completely disgusted by party and drinking culture, which is probably for the better anyway. but it's like that for so much more. I've adopted a much more nihilistic outlook on everything, which sucks because I want to be happy again. I want to be 12 and playing minecraft with my friends again, not a care in the world and ignoring politics
>>2772 >i experienced it myself. im now completely disgusted by party and drinking culture, which is probably for the better anyway. but it's like that for so much more. I've adopted a much more nihilistic outlook on everything You can work on that. I don't like partying and drinking, but I'll let others do whatever. It doesn't affect me what people I don't interact with does, or what people I do interact with does while I am not interacting with them. What others do doesn't matter to me anymore at all. >I want to be 12 and playing minecraft with my friends again, not a care in the world and ignoring politics I don't know about feeling 12 and playing minecraft for the first time again, but I do know that it's quite possible to stop reading news and avoid communities where news and politics are a common topic. I just focus on all of my niche interests, nobody talks about politics where it does not matter. It's a bit depressing sometimes sure and I do feel negative towards a lot of things, but if you let your mind obsess over it then it only gets worse every year. It is possible to break the cycle somewhat. Getting really really into a hobby helps for me, be it watching anime or programming, anything but spending too much time in online communities. They do more harm than good without long consistent breaks.
I say it does a bit of both. Some of the funnest memories that I have ever had were on imageboards. Browsing really helped me remedy my loneliness during my teen and young adult years. It was nice to meet up with a group of dorks who shared the same interests as me, without any forum drama (or at least, much less of it due name-friendging/trip-friendging being discouraged) and normals. I learned so many things through imageboards too, and some of the funniest (and most fun) memories I have are from the boards. But imageboards were also a double-edge sword for me. I believe they became an addiction for me, so instead of going out and communicating with the real world, I became a recluse who was addicted to anime and video games. Another this is that imageboards degraded my mental health. For example, I used to browse /pol/ (4chan and eventually 8chan) a lot for learning about history, (/his/frens were on /pol/ too so I didn't really bother visiting /his/) for the bantz, and for the HAPPENING threads. And while I did have fun, /pol/ made me extremely paranoid and depressed about the state of the world. Because of /pol/ (...and maybe /k/ too), I used be super paranoid of all the bad things that happen, and it made life more mentally draining for me. Politics is hell, so I stopped browsing /pol/ altogether, along with any other board that had doomposting or blackpill-posting all together. Doing that really improved my psyche. I still do come back for habbenings though. So, Imageboards really helped me out in formulating my hobbies. But they also were very addicting to me-- I never accomplished anything because I was so consumed with browsing them. Nowadays I don't really browse imageboards like I used to, especially since 8chan is gone. But I still hang around the webring from time to time. Ever since I stopped browsing them so frequently, my mental health has improved, and my life is slowly getting back together. I'm finally dedicating my life to my hobbies more and doing the things that I want to do. TL;DR: From my personal experience, imageboards are fun if you want to stay away from normalfriend communities and have a good time. May even learn something new from them. However, browsing an imageboard can be addicting and the content on them may stress you out.
>>2778 >you can work on that i m trying, I think the main part of the problem stems from having one of my friends get really big into drinking and later attempt suicide, something which he now blames as a big part. I should try to go to a few parties to realise that it's not as bad as it seems in my mind. >feeling 12 and playing minecraft for the first time I agree, and that's something I am working on. I have a few games I play a bit, and I should probably dig into their communities more. Making friends IRL def won't help since I doubt many studying to be engineering majors play milsim LARPs or 4x games but I can always hope and ask around. I did that with my friends back in highschool and it felt awesome to not have to socialize online for a while i agree. >>2783 True, I've experienced this myself. I talked to some friends about this, and one of them brought up the term "faux-socialization" which I really liked, as well as "terminally online". It's scary how potent technology is at giving us a false sense of community, and a balance must be kept. I had a /pol/ paranoia phase as well, luckily only a couple of years. The best way to get out of it is to realise that realistically, if things were as bad as they were, you can only really work on yourself and your community, and focus on that. But don't forget to improve and develop your beliefs, and seek conflict and debate, but not always
>>2787 >I should try to go to a few parties to realise that it's not as bad as it seems in my mind. You don't have to do that. It's okay to not like drinking or partying. Just try not to worry about it. Sorry about your friend.
>>2787 >false sense of community I wouldn't exactly say it's completely false as long as it's a small community and close-knit. But other than that, yeah, I absolutely agree. Also, sound advice at the end there.
>>2796 My issue is that I now see partying as this super deplorable and disgusting in which only the worst people take part in it. I know that's not true because I have friends which are normal, but I grew more distant to them once I found that out. I think that once I go to a party I will realise that it's not as bad as what I've made it out to me, which is my goal >>2808 If you have a small community, it's definitely better. But even then, you don't know this person IRL, and as such have no real physical connection, which is a big issue of being online. Even a video call has been ruined since we disassociate people from our computer screens.

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